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Contemporary Challenges Credits
Internships

John Cabot University (Italy)

Rome, Italy

Program Overview

Term Start Date End Date Application Deadline
Fall 2020
Sep 19, 2020
Dec 15, 2020
Mar 15, 2020
Academic Year 2020
Sep 19, 2020
May 08, 2021
Mar 15, 2020
Spring 2021
Jan 11, 2021
May 08, 2021
Oct 01, 2020
Language(s) of Instruction
English
Yes
Yes
No
Class Standing
First semester Sophomore
Junior
Second semester Sophomore
Senior
2.67, Firm | 3.3 for 1st Semester Sophomores
Restrictions

*Note: Fall 2020 will be a condensed semester (89 days).

Program Type
Internship
Credits

12-15

Program Advisor

The Program

Study at a prestigious, American-style liberal arts university in the heart of Rome - one of the world's most historic cities

John Cabot University (JCU), an American-style liberal arts university, welcomes approximately 600 study abroad students a year as well and as some 350 full degree-seeking Italian and international students. JCU offers courses in a variety of departments taught in English and Italian, with majors including Economics and Finance, International Business, Art History, Political Science, Communications, and Business Administration. The JCU campus is located in the Trastevere neighborhood, right in the heart of Rome. Students will take classes at Guarini and Tiber Campuses/Buildings, each less than a 10 minute walk from the other, with the Tiber Campus located right on the famous River!

Program Locations

Image
The Trevi Fountain is illuminated at dusk

Italy

Rome

Testaments to Rome’s preeminence are found all over the city, in the shape of the Colosseum, the Pantheon, St Peter’s Basilica, the Villa Borghese, the Spanish Steps, the Trevi Fountain, and a series of baroque piazzas. But despite the architectural backdrop, Rome is no ancient monument; it’s a fun, fast-moving city. In summer, the city’s calendar is packed with musical, theatrical, and literary events. And Rome is a center of world cinema, too—you can visit the Cinecittà studios—with an international film festival in October. When it comes to nightlife, the city has more than its fair share of bars and clubs, only don’t expect things to get started early—the locals will likely still be enjoying a late night dinner. Rome’s mild climate means you can be out on the streets and in the piazzas, strolling, enjoying the vibe, seeing and being seen, nearly all year round. Living in Trastevere, students are able to easily walk, tram, or taxi to any of the  monuments, spaces, buildings and piazzas! At John Cabot, Rome truly is your campus. 

Academics

In order to have an idea of what classes are available, you should visit the John Cabot University website.

The Rutgers Italian department has created a list of John Cabot University courses and their Rutgers equivalencies.  For a list of courses click here. Should you have any questions, or you do not see your course listed, please contact the Italian department.

You will need to be sure that you are registered as a full time student according to both JCU  and Rutgers University. That means you will need to take at least 12 credits each semester. The credit translation system between JCU and Rutgers University is 1:1, meaning a 3-credit course at JCU will also be a 3-credit course on your Rutgers University transcript.  It is not possible to take classes not-for-credit or pass/fail.

For information about Study Abroad credit transfer, registration, and transcripts please visit the Academics section of our website.

Internship Opportunities

John Cabot University offers students the opportunity to participate in for-credit internships. JCU has many long standing and mutually beneficial agreements with international profit and non-profit organizations.  You will work a total of 120-150 contact hours during the 14 week semester. Students will earn up to 3 credits. For more information please visit the John Cabot University Internship web page.  Please note that internships cannot be guaranteed before a student goes abroad.

Academic Calendar

Fall Semester

Late August

Mid December

Spring Semester

Early January

Late April

Housing and Meals

 

Housing assignments are made at the discretion of John Cabot University.  Should you request or be placed in housing outside of the standard placements, you will be responsible for the pricing difference.  This includes, but is not limited to, placement in single rooms. The furniture and amenities are standard across all JCU Housing, including internet and independent heating.

 

Students have apartment options:

VIALE TRASTEVERE– This is the standard housing option.  The apartment is located in a residential area within an easy commute to the JCU Campuses (approximately a 20-25 minute walk or 15 minutes by public transportation).  Each apartment accommodates nine students divided into two triple bedrooms, one double room and one single room with two full bathrooms, one equipped kitchen (including washing machine), and a spacious living-room with a sitting and dining area.  The Viale Trastevere Apartments are convenient to public transportation including buses, tram line, and the Trastevere train station (with a direct train to Fiumicino International airport).

EXTERNAL APARTMENTS – These apartments are mixed into buildings and neighborhoods with locals.  Apartment rooms/suites are all JCU students; they are often Italian/European students. This option is great for students looking for a little more independence!

GIANICOLO RESIDENCE (& Lungara)– This is an upgrade-housing option (additional money due to JCU-directly). This is home to a series of apartment-style student residences in Rome’s Trastevere neighborhood. The apartment is just steps away from the Guarini campus and a short walk to the Tiber Campus Student Center and its dining services. Apartments house between two and eight students and include a kitchen, bathroom(s) and a common living space. The building offers 24/7 security, a regular cleaning service, and air conditioning.  (Note: This costs more than the approved standard & external options. Also, during the Fall semester, this housing is mostly gap-year freshman.)

 

A meal plan can be purchased and used only at the Tiber Cafe in the Tiber Student Center. Participating students are issued vouchers that can be used for a full meal at lunch time.

Financial Information

Program Costs

This is the billed amount that will appear on your Rutgers term bill during the term you study abroad.
All Students
Program Cost $19,220
Program Cost includes:

•    Tuition up to 17-credits
•    *Housing  
•    Administrative Fees
•    International SOS Health Insurance

* Should you request or be placed in housing outside of the standard placements, you will be responsible for the pricing difference.  This includes, but is not limited to, placement in Gianicolo or in single rooms.  If you have submitted your application for housing, and you then withdraw from the program you will be responsible for a $1000 non-refundable housing deposit to JCU.  Additionally, after the housing unit has been occupied, no refund is possible. 

Out-of-Pocket Costs

These are estimated expenses that are not part of your term bill. Students will need to pay for these expenses out-of-pocket.
Airfare $1,200
Meals $2,500
Visa (Estimate is for US Citizens) $56
Residence Permit (Estimate is for US Citizens) $200
Refundable key deposit $50
Books and Classroom Materials $200
Local Transportation $250
Personal Expenses $2,500
Total $6,956.00
Out-of-Pocket Cost includes:

The above costs are estimations and represent the known out-of-pocket costs students encounter during their time abroad.
 
Some of these expenses will be paid for prior to going abroad, such as an airline ticket and visa costs, while some of these expenses, such as meals and local transportation, will be paid in-country as part of your daily expenses. As you plan, you will need to budget these costs and spend wisely throughout your time abroad.

 

Program Costs

This is the billed amount that will appear on your Rutgers term bill during the term you study abroad.
All Students
Program Cost per semester $18,240
Program Cost includes:

•    Tuition up to 17-credits
•    *Housing  
•    Administrative Fees
•    International SOS Health Insurance

* Should you request or be placed in housing outside of the standard placements, you will be responsible for the pricing difference.  This includes, but is not limited to, placement in Gianicolo or in single rooms.  If you have submitted your application for housing, and you then withdraw from the program you will be responsible for a $1000 non-refundable housing deposit to JCU.  Additionally, after the housing unit has been occupied, no refund is possible. 

 

Out-of-Pocket Costs

These are estimated expenses that are not part of your term bill. Students will need to pay for these expenses out-of-pocket.
Airfare $1,200
Meals $5,000
Visa (Estimate is for US Citizens) $56
Residence Permit (Estimate is for US Citizens) $200
Refundable key deposit $50
Books and Classroom Materials $400
Local Transportation $500
Personal Expenses $5,000
Total $12,406.00
Out-of-Pocket Cost includes:

The above costs are estimations and represent the known out-of-pocket costs students encounter during their time abroad.
 
Some of these expenses will be paid for prior to going abroad, such as an airline ticket and visa costs, while some of these expenses, such as meals and local transportation, will be paid in-country as part of your daily expenses. As you plan, you will need to budget these costs and spend wisely throughout your time abroad.

 

Program Costs

This is the billed amount that will appear on your Rutgers term bill during the term you study abroad.
All Students
Program Cost $19,220
Program Cost includes:

•    Tuition up to 17-credits
•    *Housing  
•    Administrative Fees
•    International SOS Health Insurance

* Should you request or be placed in housing outside of the standard placements, you will be responsible for the pricing difference.  This includes, but is not limited to, placement in Gianicolo or in single rooms.  If you have submitted your application for housing, and you then withdraw from the program you will be responsible for a $1000 non-refundable housing deposit to JCU.  Additionally, after the housing unit has been occupied, no refund is possible. 

Out-of-Pocket Costs

These are estimated expenses that are not part of your term bill. Students will need to pay for these expenses out-of-pocket.
Airfare $1,200
Meals $2,500
Visa (Estimate is for US Citizens) $56
Residence Permit (Estimate is for US Citizens) $200
Refundable key deposit $50
Books and Classroom Materials $200
Local Transportation $250
Personal Expenses $2,500
Total $6,956.00
Out-of-Pocket Cost includes:

The above costs are estimations and represent the known out-of-pocket costs students encounter during their time abroad.
 
Some of these expenses will be paid for prior to going abroad, such as an airline ticket and visa costs, while some of these expenses, such as meals and local transportation, will be paid in-country as part of your daily expenses. As you plan, you will need to budget these costs and spend wisely throughout your time abroad.

 

Program Costs

This is the billed amount that will appear on your Rutgers term bill during the term you study abroad.
All Students
Program Cost $18,830
Program Cost includes:

•    Tuition up to 17-credits
•    *Housing  
•    Administrative Fees
•    International SOS Health Insurance

* Should you request or be placed in housing outside of the standard placements, you will be responsible for the pricing difference.  This includes, but is not limited to, placement in Gianicolo or in single rooms.  If you have submitted your application for housing, and you then withdraw from the program you will be responsible for a $1000 non-refundable housing deposit to JCU.  Additionally, after the housing unit has been occupied, no refund is possible. 

Out-of-Pocket Costs

These are estimated expenses that are not part of your term bill. Students will need to pay for these expenses out-of-pocket.
Airfare $1,200
Meals $2,500
Visa (Estimate is for US Citizens) $56
Residence Permit (Estimate is for US Citizens) $200
Refundable key deposit $50
Books and Classroom Materials $200
Local Transportation $250
Personal Expenses $2,500
Total $6,956.00
Out-of-Pocket Cost includes:

The above costs are estimations and represent the known out-of-pocket costs students encounter during their time abroad.

Some of these expenses will be paid for prior to going abroad, such as an airline ticket, while some of these expenses, such as meals and personal expenses, will be paid in-country as part of your daily expenses. As you plan, you will need to budget these costs and spend wisely throughout your time abroad.

Scholarships

Available to all Rutgers students participating in a Rutgers Global–Study Abroad program. Applications can be found inside of your study abroad program application. For more information, please visit the Scholarship section of our website.

Available to study abroad students who receive a Pell Grant.  For more information about the scholarship and additional eligibility requirements please visit the Gilman website.

Several scholarships are available with various application criteria.  For more information please visit the NAIF website. 

Student Spotlight

John is in a sweater and jeans sitting on a wall overlooking the river in Florence

"On my flight to Rome I quickly started meeting other students who were studying abroad in Rome and that eased my worries. I chose to study abroad because I felt that this would be the perfect time for me to get to travel and explore the world, while simultaneously being able to receive an exceptional higher education at a foreign institution. Living in Rome was absolutely amazing and I still cannot believe to this day that I got to live in such a beautiful city for 4 months. I do not recall ever being bored in Rome because when I wasn’t in class or studying, I was out and about exploring as much of the ancient city that I could. I was even lucky enough to have been in Rome for the rare snowfall that occurred in late February. Before this snowfall, the Eternal City of Rome had not seen snow in over 30 years. It was awesome to be able to see such a beautiful city covered in a little over an inch of snow, but to see the reaction of young Romans to see and play in snow for the first time in their life was priceless."

Maria is sitting on a rock wall in front of some ruins. There are many people sight seeing beneath the wall.

 

"I think the culture shock came in the little things. Like how Italians pass you as they walk on the opposite side, using coins for one dollar bills, having to turn the gas valve on to get your stove to work, or not having a dryer at your disposal. Italy’s culture is slightly different than ours, but I looked at it in a sense that this is life and other people live differently. Like making a stop at their local cafe in the morning is a part of their routine, and it quickly became mine too. Diving into this culture was fun and exciting." 

Chania Harris

"While I know that a lot of people will reflect on the bouts of homesickness they went through and how much they loved the people and the food in Italy, I think that what really needs to be discussed is how much my view of the world has changed because of this experience. One way in which this has occurred is in the simple fact that I no longer romanticize Rome, or Italy as a whole. I took a class called Rome: Modern City which was an on-site class, and I expected it to be somewhat of a touristy kind of class. However, my Professor did not simply take us around Rome like a tour group. No, what he did was use this platform as a way to show us that while Rome is a beautiful city, it has its faults. For instance, the city is composed heavily around the tourist attractions that depict the ruins of the great Ancient Rome, but the people that come to see these attractions are not told the full history of how or why these monuments are here, and the consequences that came from their excavation. So many people were displaced by Mussolini with the excavation of the Roman Forum, but the government of course does not relay this information because it will change the meaning of these monuments. This was just one of many ways that that class impacted me."