Embedded Spring: Constitutions and the Founding of the American Republic

Oxford, United Kingdom

Program Overview

Term Start Date End Date Application Deadline
Embedded Spring 2022
Mar 13, 2022
Mar 19, 2022
Dec 01, 2021
Language(s) of Instruction
English
No
No
No
Class Standing
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
3.0
Restrictions

This program will be a 1-credit, 6-day-long visit to Oxford University conducted during Spring Break in the Spring 2022 semester. Students will participate in a 3-credit semester-long history seminar that will introduce the themes and topics of the trip.

Credits

1

Program Advisor

The Program

What does the Constitution actually do? Find out in Oxford, UK.

Study the governing documents of the United States in the context of negotiated treaties and constitutions with Rutgers and Oxford researchers at Pembroke College. Discuss political legitimacy, state formation, and the legacy of British legal institutions while visiting the colleges and museums of Oxford and the ancestral home of George Washington’s family.

pub

Program Locations

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pembrokecollege

England

Oxford

Oxford, a city in central southern England, revolves around its prestigious university, established in the 12th century. The architecture of its 38 colleges in the city’s medieval center led poet Matthew Arnold to nickname it the 'City of Dreaming Spires'. 

Academics

This program will be a 1-credit, 6-day-long visit to Oxford University conducted during Spring Break in the Spring 2022 semester. Students will participate in a 3-credit semester-long history seminar that will introduce the themes and topics of the trip.

In the course students will be studying the founding of the American republic and working to document the 1947 New Jersey state constitutional convention on the Quill Project, a digital interactive platform created at Pembroke College to illustrate how constitutions and treaties are negotiated and crafted. Students will share their discoveries with Quill Project students and faculty in lectures and workshops, research their own individual projects at the Bodleian Library, and tour sites of significance to the themes of the course.

Academic Calendar

Spring embedded 2022

Housing and Meals

Accommodations and dining will be at Pembroke College. All meals are included. There will be one group meal at a pub in Oxford.

Financial Information

Program Costs

This is the billed amount that will appear on your Rutgers term bill during the term you study abroad.
All Students
Program Cost $2,530
Program Cost includes:
  • Tuition
  • Housing
  • All meals
  • Excursions
  • Administrative Fees
  • International SOS Health Insurance

Out-of-Pocket Costs

These are estimated expenses that are not part of your term bill. Students will need to pay for these expenses out-of-pocket.
Flight $1,000
Meals $200
Personal Expenses $100
Total $1,300.00
Out-of-Pocket Cost includes:

The above costs are estimations and represent the known out-of-pocket costs students encounter during their time abroad.

Some of these expenses will be paid for prior to going abroad, such as an airline ticket, while some of these expenses, such as personal expenses, will be paid in-country as part of your daily expenses. As you plan, you will need to budget these costs and spend wisely throughout your time abroad.

Scholarships

Available to all Rutgers students participating in a Rutgers Global–Study Abroad program. Applications can be found inside of your study abroad program application. For more information, please visit the Scholarship section of our website.

Faculty Leaders

Brian Murphy

Born in Paterson, Professor Murphy studied at Haverford College and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Before joining Rutgers in 2016 he previously taught at Baruch College, where he won a Whiting Fellowship for excellence in teaching and was a member of the faculty of the Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York.

Professor Murphy is the author of Building the Empire State: Political Economy in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), which shared the James A. Broussard Best First Book Prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.